WorksheetControls

WorksheetControls - Notes on Excel Worksheet Controls Excel...

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Notes on Excel Worksheet Controls Excel Review 2001-2002
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Notes on Excel Worksheet Controls Page 1 Notes on Excel Worksheet Controls Introduction You can build a custom form for a worksheet by using Excel controls. Buttons, check boxes, drop-down lists, spinners, and other kinds of controls can make a worksheet easier for you and others to use. There are two categories of Excel controls you can choose from, and there’s a close correspondance between the two. Controls on the Forms toolbar are something of a holdover from earlier versions of Excel. These controls don’t require any special programming or definition other than what can be provided from within Excel itself. Use a control from the Forms toolbar when you need a control to run a single macro or for a simple interactive worksheet. In contrast, controls from the Control Toolbox are more sophisticated. They’re closely linked to Excel’s Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) environment and require that you write code to manage how the control works. For forms and dialog boxes intended for custom VBA programs or for use on the Web, these controls are more suitable. If you write a macro for a control from the Control Toolbox the macro code is stored with the control itself. The Control Toolbox contains a number of options that aren’t available on the Forms toolbar, such as toggle buttons and image controls.
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Notes on Excel Worksheet Controls Page 2 When you add a control to a worksheet, you can change the properties of the control. The properties of a control define things such as its appearance, the cell or range of cells the control refers to, and the state of the control (for example, if a check box is selected or clear by default). If you choose to do so you’ll have an opportunity to employ some controls from the Control Toolbox in Assignment 3, Level 2 and I’ll provide notes about how to manage those controls for that assignment. An in-depth discussion of Control Toolbox controls is beyond the scope of this handout but you can find more information about them in the Visual Basic for Applications help system that’s part of MS Office. The rest of this discussion focuses on the simpler controls that are located on Excel’s Forms toolbar. Using Forms Toolbar Controls All the control buttons on the Forms toolbar work using the same two-part process: 1) Draw the control on the worksheet, and 2) Format the control. Formatting a control determines what data is associated with the control. In addition, formatting can change a control’s protection status, how it moves when underlying cells are moved, and what its data entry limits might be. Drawing a Control
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WorksheetControls - Notes on Excel Worksheet Controls Excel...

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