The Irrepressible conflict

The Irrepressible - politician in Massachusetts supported the slave law and died in 1852 The abolitionist movement was a direct outgrowth of the

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The Irrepressible conflict 9. What events fueled the abolitionist movement in the North and how did they do that? Most colonists thought of slavery as an evil but they also saw it as a deeply rooted social and economic institution that could be abolished only gradually through the cooperation of slaveholders. William Lloyd Garrison published a journal called “The Liberator” , which was greatly supported by free blacks. He then founded the Anti-Slavery Society which labeled slavery as a sin that must be ended right away. Daniel Webster, a
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Unformatted text preview: politician in Massachusetts supported the slave law and died in 1852. The abolitionist movement was a direct outgrowth of the Second Great Awakening. Racism was the major cause of anti-abolitionist violence in the North. Working whites feared that economic and social competition with blacks would increase if abolitionists freed the slaves and made them citizens. Consequently, Social citizens resorted to violence because abolitionism threatened their lives....
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This note was uploaded on 12/21/2011 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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