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The Civil War and Reconstructi14

The Civil War and Reconstructi14 - blockade of the Southern...

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The Civil War and Reconstruction Lincoln’s leadership and end of slavery WESTERN ADVANCE, EASTERN STALEMATE The first large battle of the war, at Bull Run, Virginia (also known as First Manassas)  near Washington, stripped away any illusions that victory would be quick or easy. It also  established a pattern, at least in the Eastern United States, of bloody Southern victories  that never translated into a decisive military advantage for the Confederacy. In contrast to its military failures in the East, the Union was able to secure battlefield  victories in the West and slow strategic success at sea.  Most of the Navy, at the war's  beginning, was in Union hands, but it was scattered and weak. Secretary of the Navy  Gideon Welles took prompt measures to strengthen it. Lincoln then proclaimed a 
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Unformatted text preview: blockade of the Southern coasts. Although the effect of the blockade was negligible at first, by 1863 it almost completely prevented shipments of cotton to Europe and blocked the importation of sorely needed munitions, clothing, and medical supplies to the South. A brilliant Union naval commander, David Farragut, conducted two remarkable operations. In April 1862, he took a fleet into the mouth of the Mississippi River and forced the surrender of the largest city in the South, New Orleans, Louisiana. In August 1864, with the cry, “Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead,” he led a force past the fortified entrance of Mobile Bay, Alabama, captured a Confederate ironclad vessel, and sealed off the port....
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