Westward Expansion and Regional Differenc23

Westward Expansion and Regional Differenc23 - as political...

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Westward Expansion and Regional Differences Nation, slavery grow in new frontier BUILDING UNITY The War of 1812 was, in a sense, a second war of independence that confirmed once  and for all the American break with England.  With its conclusion, many of the serious  difficulties that the young republic had faced since the Revolution disappeared. National  union under the Constitution brought a balance between liberty and order. With a low  national debt and a continent awaiting exploration, the prospect of peace, prosperity,  and social progress opened before the nation. Commerce cemented national unity. The privations of war convinced many of the  importance of protecting the manufacturers of America until they could stand alone  against foreign competition. Economic independence, many argued, was as essential 
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Unformatted text preview: as political independence. To foster self-sufficiency, congressional leaders Henry Clay of Kentucky and John C. Calhoun of South Carolina urged a policy of protectionism imposition of restrictions on imported goods to foster the development of American industry. The time was propitious for raising the customs tariff. The shepherds of Vermont and Ohio wanted protection against an influx of English wool. In Kentucky, a new industry of weaving local hemp into cotton bagging was threatened by the Scottish bagging industry. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, already a flourishing center of iron smelting, was eager to challenge British and Swedish iron suppliers. The tariff enacted in 1816 imposed duties high enough to give manufacturers real protection....
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