Westward Expansion and Regional Difference3

Westward Expansion and Regional Difference3 -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Westward Expansion and Regional Differences Nation, slavery grow in new frontier Frontier settlers were a varied group. One English traveler described them as "a daring,  hardy race of men, who live in miserable cabins. . .. They are unpolished but hospitable,  kind to strangers, honest, and trustworthy. They raise a little Indian corn, pumpkins,  hogs, and sometimes have a cow or two. . .. But the rifle is their principal means of  support." Dexterous with the ax, snare, and fishing line, these men blazed the trails,  built the first log cabins, and confronted Native-American tribes, whose land they  occupied. As more and more settlers penetrated the wilderness, many became farmers as well as  hunters. A comfortable log house with glass windows, a chimney, and partitioned rooms  replaced the cabin; the well replaced the spring. Industrious settlers would rapidly clear 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online