The Formation of a National Government

The Formation of a National Government - south of the...

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The Formation of a National Government Leaders crafted constitutional, legal basis for young nation British and American negotiators conducted talks in Europe.  The British envoys decided  to concede, however, when they learned of Macdonough's victory on Lake Champlain.  Faced with the depletion of the British treasury due in large part to the heavy costs of  the Napoleonic Wars, the negotiators for Great Britain accepted the Treaty of Ghent in  December 1814. It provided for the cessation of hostilities, the restoration of conquests,  and a commission to settle boundary disputes. Unaware that a peace treaty had been  signed, the two sides continued fighting into 1815 near New Orleans, Louisiana. Led by  General Andrew Jackson, the United States scored the greatest land victory of the war,  ending for once and for all any British hopes of reestablishing continental influence 
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Unformatted text preview: south of the Canadian border. While the British and Americans were negotiating a settlement, Federalist delegates selected by the legislatures of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire gathered in Hartford, Connecticut to express opposition to Mr. Madison's war. New England had managed to trade with the enemy throughout the conflict, and some areas actually prospered from this commerce. Nevertheless, the Federalists claimed that the war was ruining the economy. With a possibility of secession from the Union in the background, the convention proposed a series of constitutional amendments that would protect New England interests. Instead, the end of the war, punctuated by the smashing victory at New Orleans, stamped the Federalists with a stigma of disloyalty from which they never recovered....
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