The Colonial Peri14

The Colonial Peri14 - to ports all over the world, the...

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The Colonial Period Culture and society in the 13 British colonies With the bulk of the early settlers living in villages and towns around the harbors, many  New Englanders carried on some kind of trade or business. Common pastureland and  woodlots served the needs of townspeople, who worked small farms nearby.  Compactness made possible the village school, the village church, and the village or  town hall, where citizens met to discuss matters of common interest. The Massachusetts Bay Colony continued to expand its commerce. From the middle of  the 17th century onward it grew prosperous, so that Boston became one of America's  greatest ports. Oak timber for ships' hulls, tall pines for spars and masts, and pitch for the seams of  ships came from the Northeastern forests. Building their own vessels and sailing them 
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Unformatted text preview: to ports all over the world, the shipmasters of Massachusetts Bay laid the foundation for a trade that was to grow steadily in importance. By the end of the colonial period, one-third of all vessels under the British flag were built in New England. Fish, ship's stores, and woodenware swelled the exports. New England merchants and shippers soon discovered that rum and slaves were profitable commodities . One of their most enterprising if unsavory trading practices of the time was the "triangular trade." Traders would purchase slaves off the coast of Africa for New England rum, then sell the slaves in the West Indies where they would buy molasses to bring home for sale to the local rum producers....
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