The Colonial Peri11

The Colonial Peri11 - of deer or sheep, known as buckskin;...

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The Colonial Period Culture and society in the 13 British colonies In the southernmost colonies, as everywhere else, population growth in the backcountry  had special significance. German immigrants and Scots-Irish, unwilling to live in the  original Tidewater settlements where English influence was strong, pushed inland.  Those who could not secure fertile land along the coast, or who had exhausted the  lands they held, found the hills farther west a bountiful refuge. Although their hardships  were enormous, restless settlers kept coming; by the 1730s they were pouring into the  Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Soon the interior was dotted with farms. Living on the edge of Native-American country, frontier families built cabins, cleared the  wilderness, and cultivated maize and wheat. The men wore leather made from the skin 
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Unformatted text preview: of deer or sheep, known as buckskin; the women wore garments of cloth they spun at home. Their food consisted of venison, wild turkey, and fish. They had their own amusements great barbecues, dances, housewarmings for newly married couples, shooting matches, and contests for making quilted blankets. Quilt-making remains an American tradition today. SOCIETY, SCHOOLS, AND CULTURE A significant factor deterring the emergence of a powerful aristocratic or gentry class in the colonies was the ability of anyone in an established colony to find a new home on the frontier. Time after time, dominant Tidewater figures were obliged to liberalize political policies, land-grant requirements, and religious practices by the threat of a mass exodus to the frontier....
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