The Road to Independen15

The Road to Independen15 - reducing British taxes by making...

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The Road to Independence Rebellion that made a  new  nation The British Parliament rejected the colonial contentions.  British merchants, however,  feeling the effects of the American boycott, threw their weight behind a repeal moveme nt.  In 1766 Parliament yielded, repealing the Stamp Act and modifying the Sugar Act.  However, to mollify the supporters of central control over the colonies, Parliament  followed these actions with passage of the Declaratory Act, which asserted the authority  of Parliament to make laws binding the colonies "in all cases whatsoever."  The colonists  had won only a temporary respite from an impending crisis. THE TOWNSHEND ACTS The year 1767 brought another series of measures that stirred anew all the elements of  discord. Charles Townshend, British chancellor of the exchequer, attempted a new fiscal  program in the face of continued discontent over high taxes at home. Intent upon 
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Unformatted text preview: reducing British taxes by making more efficient the collection of duties levied on American trade, he tightened customs administration and enacted duties on colonial imports of paper, glass, lead, and tea from Britain. The Townshend Acts were based on the premise that taxes imposed on goods imported by the colonies were legal while internal taxes (like the Stamp Act) were not. The Townshend Acts were designed to raise revenue that would be used in part to support colonial officials and maintain the British army in America. In response, Philadelphia lawyer John Dickinson, in Letters of a Pennsylvania Farmer , argued that Parliament had the right to control imperial commerce but did not have the right to tax the colonies, whether the duties were external or internal....
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This note was uploaded on 12/21/2011 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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