Human habitation

Human habitation - Human habitation The Bering land bridge...

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Human habitation The Bering land bridge is significant for several reasons, not least because it is believed to have enabled human migration to the Americas from Asia about 20,000 years ago. [10] A study by Hey [11] has indicated that of the people migrating across this land bridge during that time period, only 70 left their genetic print in modern descendants, a minute effective founder population —easily misread as though implying that only 70 people crossed to North America. Seagoing coastal settlers may also have crossed much earlier, but scientific opinion remains divided on this point, and the coastal sites that would offer further information now lie submerged in up to a hundred metres of water offshore. Land animals were able to migrate through Beringia as well, bringing mammals that had evolved in Asia to North America , mammals such as proboscideans and lions , which evolved into now-extinct endemic North American species, and allowing equids and camelids that evolved in North America (and later became extinct there)
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Human habitation - Human habitation The Bering land bridge...

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