Bridge to the 21st Centur2

Bridge to the 21st Centur2 - States could not impose one if...

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Bridge to the 21st Century The Clinton and Bush II years In January 2007, the president adopted an anti-insurgency strategy advocated by  General David Petraeus — one of outreach and support for Sunni leaders willing to  accept a new democratic order in Iraq, along with continued backing of the  predominantly Shiite government in Baghdad. He accompanied this with a “surge” of  additional troops. Over the next year, the strategy appeared to calm the country. The  United States began to turn over increased security responsibilities to the Iraqis and  negotiated an agreement for complete withdrawal by 2011. Nonetheless, Iraq remained  very unstable, its fragile peace regularly disrupted by bombings and assassinations, its  Sunni-Shiite conflict complicated by Kurdish separatists. It was not clear whether a  democratic nation could be created out of such chaos, but it was clear that the United 
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Unformatted text preview: States could not impose one if the Iraqis did not want it. As Iraq progressed uncertainly toward stability, Afghanistan moved in the other direction. The post-Taliban government of Hamid Karzai proved unable to establish effective control over the historically decentralized country. Operating from the Pakistani tribal areas to which they had escaped in 2001, the Taliban and al-Qaida began to filter back into Afghanistan and establish significant areas of control in the southern provinces. Using remote-controlled drone aircraft equipped with guided missiles, U.S. forces staged attacks against enemy encampments and leaders within Pakistan. In 2009, the new American president, Barack Obama, approved a U.S. military buildup and anti-insurgency effort similar to the Iraq surge. As with Iraq, the outcome remained in doubt....
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