Bridge to the 21st Centur6

Bridge to the 21st Centur6 - nuclear capability. Why else...

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Bridge to the 21st Century The Clinton and Bush II years In the meantime, the Bush administration was looking elsewhere for sources of enemy  terrorism. In his 2002 State of the Union address, the president identified an “axis of  evil” that he thought threatened the nation: Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Of these three,  Iraq seemed to him and his advisers the most troublesome and probably easiest to  bring down. Saddam Hussein had ejected United Nations weapons inspectors. The economic  sanctions against Iraq were breaking down, and, although the regime was not believed  to be involved in the 9/11 attacks, it had engaged in some contacts with al-Qaida. It was  widely believed, not just in the United States but throughout the world, that Iraq had  large stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons and might be working to acquire a 
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Unformatted text preview: nuclear capability. Why else throw out the inspection teams and endure continuing sanctions? Throughout the year, the administration pressed for a United Nations resolution demanding resumption of weapons inspection with full and free access. In October 2002, Iraq declared it would comply. Nonetheless, the new inspectors complained of bad faith. In January, their chief, Hans Blix, presented a report to the UN declaring that Iraq had failed to account for its weapons of mass destruction; he recommended resumption of weapons inspections. Bush in the meantime had received a Senate authorization by a vote of 7723 for the use of military force. The U.S. military began a buildup of personnel and materiel in Kuwait....
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