Postwar Ameri17 - enclave far to the south around the city...

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Postwar America U.S.    dominates global affairs In June 1950, after consultations with and having obtained the assent of the Soviet  Union, North Korean leader Kim Il-sung dispatched his Soviet-supplied army across the  38th parallel and attacked southward, overrunning Seoul. Truman, perceiving the North  Koreans as Soviet pawns in the global struggle, readied American forces and ordered  World War II hero General Douglas MacArthur to Korea. Meanwhile, the United States  was able to secure a U.N. resolution branding North Korea as an aggressor. (The Soviet  Union, which could have vetoed any action had it been occupying its seat on the  Security Council, was boycotting the United Nations to protest a decision not to admit  Mao’s new Chinese regime.) The war seesawed back and forth. U.S. and Korean forces were initially pushed into an 
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Unformatted text preview: enclave far to the south around the city of Pusan. A daring amphibious landing at Inchon, the port for the city of Seoul, drove the North Koreans back and threatened to occupy the entire peninsula. In November, China entered the war, sending massive forces across the Yalu River. U.N. forces, largely American, retreated once again in bitter fighting. Commanded by General Matthew B. Ridgway, they stopped the overextended Chinese, and slowly fought their way back to the 38th parallel. MacArthur meanwhile challenged Trumans authority by attempting to orchestrate public support for bombing China and assisting an invasion of the mainland by Chiang Kai-shek's forces. In April 1951, Truman relieved him of his duties and replaced him with Ridgway....
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