Postwar Ameri13 - Roosevelt at Yalta, was publicly accused...

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Postwar America U.S.    dominates global affairs When Republicans were victorious in the midterm congressional elections of 1946 and  appeared ready to investigate subversive activity, President Truman established a  Federal Employee Loyalty Program.  It had little impact on the lives of most civil  servants, but a few hundred were dismissed, some unfairly. In 1947 the House Committee on Un-American Activities investigated the motion-picture  industry to determine whether Communist sentiments were being reflected in popular  films. When some writers (who happened to be secret members of the Communist  Party) refused to testify, they were cited for contempt and sent to prison.  After that, the  film companies refused to hire anyone with a marginally questionable past. In 1948, Alger Hiss, who had been an assistant secretary of state and an adviser to 
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Unformatted text preview: Roosevelt at Yalta, was publicly accused of being a Communist spy by Whittaker Chambers, a former Soviet agent. Hiss denied the accusation, but in 1950 he was convicted of perjury. Subsequent evidence indicates that he was indeed guilty. In 1949 the Soviet Union shocked Americans by testing its own atomic bomb. In 1950, the government uncovered a British-American spy network that transferred to the Soviet Union materials about the development of the atomic bomb. Two of its operatives, Julius Rosenberg and his wife Ethel, were sentenced to death. Attorney General J. Howard McGrath declared there were many American Communists, each bearing "the germ of death for society."...
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