The New Deal and World War 19

The New Deal and World War 19 - of private electric...

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The New Deal and World War II Roosevelt’s leadership through economic reconstruction, war A Public Works Administration (PWA) provided employment for skilled construction  workers on a wide variety of mostly medium- to large-sized projects. Among the most  memorable of its many accomplishments were the Bonneville and Grand Coulee Dams  in the Pacific Northwest, a new Chicago sewer system, the Triborough Bridge in New  York City, and two aircraft carriers ( Yorktown  and  Enterprise ) for the U.S. Navy. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), both a work relief program and an exercise in  public planning, developed the impoverished Tennessee River valley area through a  series of dams built for flood control and hydroelectric power generation. Its provision of  cheap electricity for the area stimulated some economic progress, but won it the enmity 
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Unformatted text preview: of private electric companies. New Dealers hailed it as an example of grass roots democracy. The Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA), in operation from 1933 to 1935, distributed direct relief to hundreds of thousands of people, usually in the form of direct payments. Sometimes, it assumed the salaries of schoolteachers and other local public service workers. It also developed numerous small-scale public works projects, as did the Civil Works Administration (CWA) from late 1933 into the spring of 1934. Criticized as make work, the jobs funded ranged from ditch digging to highway repairs to teaching. Roosevelt and his key officials worried about costs but continued to favor unemployment programs based on work relief rather than welfare....
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