War2 - democracy. Mencken, an elitist and admirer of...

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War, Prosperity, and Depression U.S. triumphs in World War I, suffers through downturn Fundamentalism and Prohibition were aspects of a larger reaction to a modernist social  and intellectual revolution most visible in changing manners and morals that caused the  decade to be called the Jazz Age, the Roaring Twenties, or the era of “flaming youth.”   World War I had overturned the Victorian social and moral order.  Mass prosperity  enabled an open and hedonistic life style for the young middle classes. The leading intellectuals were supportive.  H.L. Mencken, the decade’s most important  social critic, was unsparing in denouncing sham and venality in American life.  He  usually found these qualities in rural areas and among businessmen.  His counterparts  of the progressive movement had believed in “the people” and sought to extend 
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Unformatted text preview: democracy. Mencken, an elitist and admirer of Nietzsche, bluntly called democratic man a boob and characterized the American middle class as the booboisie. Novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald captured the energy, turmoil, and disillusion of the decade in such works as The Beautiful and the Damned (1922) and The Great Gatsby (1925). Sinclair Lewis, the first American to win a Nobel Prize for literature, satirized mainstream America in Main Street (1920) and Babbitt (1922). Ernest Hemingway vividly portrayed the malaise wrought by the war in The Sun Also Rises (1926) and A Farewell to Arms (1929). Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and many other writers dramatized their alienation from America by spending much of the decade in Paris....
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