The French and Indian War

The French and Indian War - commandmost spectacular,...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The French and Indian War After 1757, when the British ministry of the elder William Pitt was reconstituted, Pitt was able to supervise the war in America. Affairs then took a better turn for the British. Lord Amherst in 1758 took Louisburg, where James Wolfe distinguished himself. That same year Gen. John Forbes took Fort Duquesne (which became Fort Pitt). The French Louis Joseph de Montcalm , one of the great commanders of his time, distinguished himself (1758) by repulsing the attack of James Abercromby on Ticonderoga. The next year that fort fell to Amherst. In the West, the hold of Sir William Johnson over the Iroquois and the activities of border troops under his general
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: commandmost spectacular, perhaps, were the exploits of the rangers under Robert Rogers reduced French holdings and influence. The war became a fight for the St. Lawrence, with Montcalm pitted against the brilliant Wolfe. The climax came in 1759 in the open battle on the Plains of Abraham (see Abraham, Plains of ). Both Wolfe and Montcalm were killed, but Quebec fell to the British. In 1760, Montreal also fell, and the war was over. The Treaty of Paris in 1763 (see Paris, Treaty of ) ended French control of Canada, which went to Great Britain....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online