Depressants

Depressants - Depressants Drugs Medical Origins of...

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Depressants Drugs
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Medical Origins of Addiction In the nineteenth century, patent medicines laced with morphine, opium, cocaine, and c annabis could be purchased anywhere. Physicians prescribed opiates as freely as aspirin and, as a result, physician-induced addiction (iatrogenic addiction) became common, especially among women.
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Horizontal Gaze and Nystagmus (HGN) Vertical Nystagmus (VN) Drowsy Thick, slurred speech Uncoordinated, fumbling Flaccid Muscle tone Sluggish Droopy eyelids Watery eyes Signs and Symptoms of CNS Depressant Use
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The short-term effects of heroin abuse appear soon after a single dose and disappear in a few hours. After an injection of heroin, the user reports feeling a surge of euphoria ("rush") accompanied by a warm flushing of the skin, a dry mouth, and heavy extremities. Following this initial euphoria, the user goes "on the nod," an alternately wakeful and drowsy state. Mental functioning becomes clouded due to the depression of the central nervous system. Long-term effects of heroin appear after repeated use for some period of time. Chronic users may develop collapsed veins, infection of the heart lining and valves, abscesses, cellulitis, and liver disease. Pulmonary complications, including various types of pneumonia, may result from the poor health condition of the abuser, as well as from heroin’s depressing effects on respiration.
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This is a photo of “Cheese “ heroin. This form of heroin is popular primarily among Hispanic youth in the Dallas Independent School District (DISD). Analyses of “Cheese”
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course SCI HTW318 taught by Professor Bergen-cico during the Fall '11 term at Syracuse.

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Depressants - Depressants Drugs Medical Origins of...

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