EarlyInterventionPrimaryPrevention

EarlyInterventionPrimaryPrevention - Early Intervention as...

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Unformatted text preview: Early Intervention as a form of Family­Focused Primary Prevention Presented by M. Heyn 4/25/11 CONCEPTS OF PREVENTION REDUCE SUPPLY SECONDARY PREVENTION LIFESKILLS TRAINING DARE REDUCE DEMAND PRIMARY PREVENTION FAMILYFOCUSED PRIMARY PREVENTION REDUCE HARM TERTIARY PREVENTION NORMATIVE EDUCATION AMPS Early Intervention Early Intervention Primary prevention tries to anticipate and prevent initial drug use (Inaba and Cohen, 2007­page 375) It also undertakes to build self­esteem by examining the roots of susceptibility to addiction and helping children handle the confusion, anger, or pain of growing up (Inaba and Cohen, 2007­page 375) The most effective prevention programs seem to be those in which students are taught self­esteem and confidence and in which they learn not to be afraid of their feelings (Inaba and Cohen, 2007­page 392) Because the roots of most addictions come from the family, family focused primary prevention is a necessary adjunct to any school­based program (Inaba and Cohen, 2007­page 392) Early Intervention Early Intervention The family approach makes sense because susceptibility to addiction often stems from family dynamics. Family support, skills training, and therapy, along with parenting programs, seem to reduce the risk factors that lead to drug abuse and addiction (Inaba and Cohen, 2007­page 372) Specific coping skills, like parenting classes, anger management, and even breathing techniques, are taught to help people face stressful situations. Coping skills are seen as a way to develop self­reliance, confidence, and inner resources needed to resist drug use (Inaba and Cohen, 2007­page 371) Sexual, physical, and emotional abuse at a young age are the most powerful environmental factors in raising a person’s susceptibility to alcohol/drug abuse (Inaba and Cohen, 2007­ page 228) Divorce Child Abuse ADH d one D School Refusal /Impris rested s Ar Parent re ic Failu rugs m ther D Acade hol and O Alco Anxiety Parenting Struggles Sexual Acting Out Lyin vior g ng Beha llyi Bu ior us Behav Anger Management B Social Struggles Per f ec Poverty tion Encopresis (Soiling) ism m Aggression utis (Ob s/A ses erger p Pare As siv nts D eC e eplo om Abus l yed pul Sexua Self-Image (Shame) siv eB Enuresis (Wetting) eha vio r) Conduct Issues (Breaking Rules) Death of a Loved One on Poo ressi r Hy ep D gien e Family issues Oppositional Behavior Special Education/Emotional Disturbance Untreated Mental Health Issues in Untreated Mental Health Issues in Childhood Progressing to Toxic Levels of Shame ANXIETY ADHD PARENTAL DRUG ADDICTION I’M NOT GOOD ENOUGH Remuda Ranch Treatment Facility Skillbuilding Relationship Skills Distress Tolerance Emotional Regulation Freedom to Choose Better Behaviors Excessive Feelings of Shame Increase Likelihood of Addictive Behavior Drug Addiction Exercise Addiction Gambling Addiction I’M NOT GOOD ENOUGH “Rage”­aholic” Gaming Addiction Sex Addiction Eating Disorder Six Basic Emotions GUILT Guilt lets you know you broke a rule FEAR Fear helps you to protect yourself LOVE SADNESS Love helps you figure out what you like ANGER Anger helps you figure out what you do not like and gets you to do something about it Sadness moves emotions out of your body SHAME Shame lets you know you’re not perfect and gets you to make yourself better © Matthew G. Heyn & Mary Beach, 2005 Key Ingredients Of Effective Prevention Programs Key Ingredients Of Effective Prevention Programs TREATMENT Remuda Ranch Skillbuilding Relationship Skills Distress Tolerance Emotional Regulation Freedom to Choose Better Behaviors From W.T. Grant Consortium Identifying and labeling feelings Expressing feelings EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE By Daniel Goleman Emotional Self­Awareness Handling Relationships Assessing the intensity of Empathy: Reading Emotions feelings Managing feelings Managing Emotions (e.g. Better at Handling Stress) Reducing stress Harnessing Emotions Productively (e.g. Less Controlling Impulses Knowing the difference between feelings and actions Impulsive/More Self­Control) TREATMENT TREATMENT Remuda Ranch Skillbuilding Relationship Skills Distress Tolerance Emotional Regulation Freedom to Choose Better Behaviors Key Ingredients Of Effective Prevention Programs Key Ingredients Of Effective Prevention Programs From W.T. Grant Consortium Identifying and labeling feelings Expressing feelings Assessing the intensity of feelings Managing feelings Reducing stress Controlling Impulses Knowing the difference between feelings and actions EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE By Daniel Goleman Emotional Self­Awareness Handling Relationships Empathy: Reading Emotions Managing Emotions (e.g. Better at Handling Stress) Harnessing Emotions Productively (e.g. Less Impulsive/More Self­Control) Jessie from Intervention Series Jessie from Childhood Anxiety­Probably Untreated ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course SCI HTW318 taught by Professor Bergen-cico during the Fall '11 term at Syracuse.

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