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Chapter09 - Chapter 9 Treatment CHAPTER OVERVIEW The most...

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Chapter 9 Treatment CHAPTER OVERVIEW The most prevalent mind disorder is substance abuse. It causes more health and social problems than any other disease. The good news is that it's treatable and has a better success rate than diseases like cancer, heart problems, diabetes, or arthritis. Current issues in treatment include: the rapidly expanding use of medications for detoxification and withdrawal, and long-term abstinence; the use of sophisticated brain-imaging techniques to study brain function; the creation of more effective tools to diagnose addiction and match clients to the most effective treatment including tools to more accurately assess withdrawal symptoms; evolving understanding of the neurophysiology involved with drug cravings and the recovery process; an increased use of evidence based practices; increasing utilization of drug courts and coerced treatment; the lack of sufficient treatment resources, and the conflict between an abstinence-oriented approach and a harm-reduction approach. continued controversy over abstinence-based and harm reduction modes of treatment. Treatment leads to recovery in 50% of cases and saves at least $4 to $39 in actual costs for every $1 spent. For those who engage in addiction treatment It results in a 75% reduction in crime. Treatment can be customized for culture, gender, ethnic origin, and other specialized populations. This chapter examines the principles and goals of treatment, the different treatment options available, selection of a specific treatment approach, initiating treatment, the continuum of treatment (detoxification, initial abstinence, long-term abstinence, and recovery), individual/group therapy, the involvement of the family, adjunctive treatment services, drug specific treatments, target populations (culturally consistent treatment), and the recent developments in treatment medications. Preventing relapse after treatment include addressing the challenges of cognitive deficits, cravings (endogenous/intrapersonal and environmental/interpersonal triggers) and post acute withdrawal symptoms (PAWS).
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This chapter also examines, in detail, topics such as motivational interviewing, stages of change model, treatment in prisons, intervention strategies, and obstacles to effective treatment.
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