Social Preferences Fishermen

Social Preferences Fishermen - DISCUSSION PAPER SERIES IZA...

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IZA DP No. 1697 Do Social Preferences Increase Productivity? Field Experimental Evidence from Fishermen in Toyama Bay Jeffrey Carpenter Erika Seki DISCUSSION PAPER SERIES Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit Institute for the Study of Labor July 2005
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Do Social Preferences Increase Productivity? Field Experimental Evidence from Fishermen in Toyama Bay Jeffrey Carpenter Middlebury College and IZA Bonn Erika Seki University of Aberdeen Discussion Paper No. 1697 July 2005 IZA P.O. Box 7240 53072 Bonn Germany Phone: +49-228-3894-0 Fax: +49-228-3894-180 Email: [email protected] Any opinions expressed here are those of the author(s) and not those of the institute. Research disseminated by IZA may include views on policy, but the institute itself takes no institutional policy positions. The Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn is a local and virtual international research center and a place of communication between science, politics and business. IZA is an independent nonprofit company supported by Deutsche Post World Net. The center is associated with the University of Bonn and offers a stimulating research environment through its research networks, research support, and visitors and doctoral programs. IZA engages in (i) original and internationally competitive research in all fields of labor economics, (ii) development of policy concepts, and (iii) dissemination of research results and concepts to the interested public. IZA Discussion Papers often represent preliminary work and are circulated to encourage discussion. Citation of such a paper should account for its provisional character. A revised version may be available directly from the author.
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IZA Discussion Paper No. 1697 July 2005 ABSTRACT Do Social Preferences Increase Productivity? Field Experimental Evidence from Fishermen in Toyama Bay We provide a reason for the wider economics profession to take social preferences, a concern for the outcomes achieved by other reference agents, seriously. Although we show that student measures of social preference elicited in an experiment have little external validity when compared to measures obtained from a field experiment with a population of participants who face a social dilemma in their daily lives (i.e., team production), we do find strong links between the social preferences of our field participants and their productivity at work. We also find that the stock of social preferences evolves endogeously with respect to how widely team production is utilized. JEL Classification: C93, D21, D24, H41, J24, M52, M54, Z13 Keywords: field experiment, social preference, income pooling, productivity Corresponding author: Jeffrey P. Carpenter Department of Economics Middlebury College Middlebury, VT 05753 USA Email: [email protected] We thank Kiyoshi Yokoo for research assistance and the National Science Foundation (CAREER 0092953) for financial support. In addition, we recognize the helpful comments of Abigail Barr, Juan Camilo Cardenas, Hugo Nopo, Peter Matthews, Will Pyle, and Pieter Serneels.
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1 Introduction
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