Vietnam Conscription

Vietnam Conscription - NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES LONG-TERM...

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Unformatted text preview: NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES LONG-TERM CONSEQUENCES OF VIETNAM-ERA CONSCRIPTION: SCHOOLING, EXPERIENCE, AND EARNINGS Joshua D. Angrist Stacey H. Chen Working Paper 13411 http://www.nber.org/papers/w13411 NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138 September 2007 This study was conducted while the authors were Special Sworn Status researchers of the U.S. Census Bureau at the Boston Research Data Center. Research results and conclusions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Census Bureau. This paper has been screened to insure that no confidential data are revealed. Special thanks got to B.K. Atrostic, Jim Davis, and Brian Holly for help with the data used in this study. Thanks also go to Brigham Frandsen and Simone Schaner for outstanding research assistance and to David Autor, Mark Duggan, Amy Finkelstein, Jerry Hausman, Whitney Newey, Sarah Turner, Steve Pischke, and participants in the Summer 2007 Labor Studies Meeting for helpful discussions and comments. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation. The views expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Bureau of Economic Research. 2007 by Joshua D. Angrist and Stacey H. Chen. All rights reserved. Short sections of text, not to exceed two paragraphs, may be quoted without explicit permission provided that full credit, including notice, is given to the source. Long-term consequences of vietnam-era conscription: schooling, experience, and earnings Joshua D. Angrist and Stacey H. Chen NBER Working Paper No. 13411 September 2007 JEL No. I18,I22,J24,J31 ABSTRACT This paper uses the 2000 Census 1-in-6 sample to look at the long-term impact of Vietnam-era military service. Instrumental Variables estimates using draft-lottery instruments show post-service earnings losses close to zero in 2000, in contrast with earlier results showing substantial earnings losses for white veterans in the 1970s and 1980s. The estimates also point to a marked increase in schooling that appears to be attributable to the Vietnam-era GI Bill. The net wage effects observed in the 2000 data can be explained by a flattening of the experience profile in middle age and a modest return to the increased schooling generated by the GI Bill. Evidence on disability effects is mixed but seems inconsistent with a long-term effect of Vietnam-era military service on health. Joshua D. Angrist Department of Economics MIT, E52-353 50 Memorial Drive Cambridge, MA 02142-1347 and NBER angrist@mit.edu Stacey H. Chen 412 NBER 1050 Mass Ave Cambridge, MA 02138 USA schen@albany.edu 1 Introduction Economists had a pivotal role in formulating the intellectual case against the draft. The core of this argument is that conscription amounts to a hidden tax on soldiers, with the further disadvantage of uncertainty as to who will have to pay (see, e.g., Oi, 1967)....
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course ECON 245a taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at UCSB.

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Vietnam Conscription - NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES LONG-TERM...

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