U-1 Introduction to College Reading and Writing.pdf - UNIT...

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UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE READING ANDWRITING1.1 FOUDATIONSAuthor, Audience, and PurposeLESSONWhen you begin reading atext, your mind must go to work immediately trying to determine who wrote the text, who thetext is for, and why the piece was written. This information can change how you interpret the text. When you do this,you're thinking about the most basic elements of areading:author,audience, andpurpose.Author:The person who wrote the text. It is important to understand the author of a text as it will change how youinterpret the text. For example, if you are looking for information about a medical condition, a friend may give somegood advice, but if it contradicts the advice that you get from a well-regarded medical professional, you might want toconsider disregarding the information from your friend.The author information is found in a number of places. It is most commonly found at the front of a book and at thebeginning or end of anarticle. In anacademic essay, it is often in theheaderand on thetitle page. In pieces publishedby institutions, organizations, or corporations, there may not be an individual author; instead, you can consider theinstitution to be the author.Audience:Who the writer expects to read the text. Realize that you may not be the primary audience for this text, asthe audience for a text is not always the same as the person or people who are reading it because writers cannotalways control who reads their work. However, when a writer composes a reading, he or she does so with aspecifictypeof reader in mind. When the writer knows who the audience is, he or she can use specific language,details, and examples to speak directly to that audience. If you are not the intended audience, it may be more dicultfor you tocomprehendthe piece.You can determine the audience by identifying where the reading is located. For example, an articleinSeventeenmagazine is intended for teenage girls, while an article in theJournal of Developmental Educationisintended for faculty and administrators of college-level developmental education programs, all of whom have collegeeducations and many of whom have advanced degrees.Purpose:Why the writer chose this topic. Every writer has a reason (purpose) for writing about a topic. You candetermine the purpose of apassageby asking yourself, "Why is the writer telling me about this?" or "What does thewriter want me to know or do after reading this?" A writer's primary purpose often falls into one of three categories—persuade, inform, or entertain.Persuade. In a persuasive piece, authors try to convince the reader that their ideas/arguments have merit.Persuasivewritingis debatable. The author wants to prove that something "should/must" or "should not/must not" be done.

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