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Altitude05 - Adaptations to altitude which should increase...

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Unformatted text preview: Adaptations to altitude which should increase V02 max. on return to sea level: a) increased hemoglobin concentration b) local muscle adaptations - increased number of mitochondria, oxidative enzymes, etc. Adaptations which hinder performance on return to sea level: a) decreased maximum stroke volume and maximum heart rate which persists for a few weeks b) increased VE at a given workload --> extra oxygen goes to respiratory muscles during exercise c) decreased buffering capacity of blood for lactic acid d) specificity of training - while at altitude, the athlete isn't able to train at close to sea level race pace. One must lower the absolute workload to perform aerobic exercise at the same relative intensity at altitude as at sea level. C. Live High — Train Low Altitude Training Athletes who use this method of training live and/or sleep at moderate altitude (65 00-9000 feet), while going to a lower elevation (less than 4000 feet), in reasonable proximity, for a few hours daily to train. The purpose of this procedure is to get the beneficial physiological altitude adaptations, while maintaining sea level training intensity. This method of training results in better sea level performance than is obtained by living and training at altitude for a number of weeks and then returning to sea level to perform. IV. ALTITUDE ILLNESSES Altitude illnesses are on a continuum and are not separate illnesses. Most altitude illness is preventable. Proper management requires early diagnosis and prompt intervention. A. Prevention of Altitude Illnesses The following measures will reduce the incidence and severity of high altitude illness. 1. Staged ascent - slow ascent to altitude while climbing. Once travellers reach 8000 ft., they should not ascend more than 1000 to 2000 ft. per day. - if possible, don’t fly or drive to high altitude. Start below 10,000 feet (3048 meters) and walk up. If you do fly or drive don’t over-exert yourself or move higher for the first 24 hours. - acclimatize to lower altitudes before going to high altitudes - "work high but sleep low" - if you begin to show symptoms of moderate altitude illness, don’t go higher until symptoms decrease. Don’t go up until symptoms go down! If symptoms increase, go down, down, down! ...
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