amorph - Programming a Paintable Computer William Joseph...

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Programming a Paintable Computer William Joseph Butera SBEE, MIT, 1982 SM, MIT, 1988 Submitted to the Program in Media Arts and Sciences, School of Architecture and Planning, in partial fulFllment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Media Arts and Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ±ebruary 2002 © MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY , 2002. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Author William Joseph Butera Program in Media Arts and Sciences CertiFed by V. Michael Bove Jr. Principal Research Scientist Program in Media Arts and Sciences Accepted by Andrew Lippman Chair, Departmental Committee on Graduate Students Program in Media Arts and Sciences
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Programming a Paintable Computer Bill Butera Submitted to the Program in Media Arts and Sciences, School of Architecture and Planning, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology February 2002 Abstract A paintable computer is defined as an agglomerate of numerous, finely dispersed, ultra-miniaturized computing particles; each positioned randomly, running asynchronously and communicating locally. Individual particles are tightly resource bound, and processing is necessarily distributed. Yet computing elements are vanishingly cheap and are regarded as freely expendable. In this regime, a limiting problem is the distribution of processing over a particle ensemble whose topology can vary unexpectedly. The principles of material self-assembly are employed to guide the positioning of "process fragments" — autonomous, mobile pieces of a larger process. These fragments spatially position themselves and re- aggregate into a running process. We present the results of simulations to show that "process self- assembly" is viable, robust and supports a variety of useful applications on a paintable computer. We describe a hardware reference platform as an initial guide to the application domain. We describe a programming model which normatively defines the term process fragment and which provides environmental support for the fragment’s mobility, scheduling and data exchange. The programming model is embodied in a simulator that supports development, test and visualization on a 2D particle ensemble. Experiments on simple combinations of fragments demonstrate robustness and explore the limits of scale invariance. Process fragments are shown interacting to approximate conservative fields, and using these fields to implement scaffolded and thermodynamic self-assembly. Four applications demonstrate practical relevance, delineate the application domain and collectively illustrate the paintable’s capacity for storage, communication and signal processing. These four applications are Audio Streaming, Holistic Data Storage, Surface Bus and Image Segmentation.
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This note was uploaded on 12/27/2011 for the course CMPSC 290h taught by Professor Chong during the Fall '09 term at UCSB.

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amorph - Programming a Paintable Computer William Joseph...

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