literature review(vimala)

literature review(vimala) - COLLEGE OF BUSINESS PROGRAMME...

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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY BJTH 3133 PROJECT PAPER LITERATURE REVIEW GROUP :B SUPERVISOR: MR.MOHD HANIZAN BIN ZALAZILAH NAME: VIMALA A/P MUTHU KUMAR MATRIC NO: 126339
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CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW 2.0 Introduction The Japanese believe that the practice of the 5S principle is not only useful for the workplace but also helps them personally by improving their thinking process. The logic behind the 5S principles at the workplace is that these principles are the basic requirements for high efficiency in producing better quality products and services with little or no waste. The effectiveness of 5S is shown by its popularity in Japan where the concept has been introduced, mainly in manufacturing and service industries. (Low Sui-Pheng and Sarah Danielle Khoo, 2001) 2.1 Overview of 5S The 5Ss represent a simple "good housekeeping" approach to improve work environment consistent with the tenets of lean manufacturing systems. The focus on this concept is how the visual workplace can be utilized to drive inefficiencies out of the manufacturing process. According to Hirano, without the organization and discipline provided by successfully implementing the 5Ss, other lean manufacturing tools and methods are likely to fail (Hiroyuki Hirano, 1995). After all, people practice the 5S’s in their personal lives without even noticing it. The "5Ss" stand for the Japanese words seiri, seiton, seiso, seiketsu, and shitsuke. These Japanese "S" words roughly translate into the English words organization, orderliness, cleanliness, standardized cleanup, and discipline. Alternative corresponding "5s" have also been developed for the English language: sort, set in order, shine, standardize, and sustain
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2.2 Definition of each S 1) Sort Sort means distinguishing between the necessary and the unnecessary, and getting rid of is not important. The necessary data should then be entered into the database while the necessary items stored at a convenient location, permitting easy access when required later (Sui-Pheng, 2001). It is a process of removing every non essential item from the workplace. This task is not always simple, as work areas have had years to build up items that aren’t necessary for completing the job. It is important to be able to identify each item, giving it a name that is easily recognizable by all. A proper name should be assigned to everything to prevent confusion as some items may have a real name but people often refer to them using a common name (Sui-Pheng, 2001). Figure 1 Categorizing things being used and not used 1.1 Red tagging An effective visual method to identify these unneeded items is called red tagging. A red tag is placed on all items not required to complete your job. These items are then moved to a central holding area. This process is for evaluation of the red tag items. Occasionally used items are moved to a more organized storage location outside of the work area while unneeded items are discarded. Once the red tag strategy is implemented, a factory’s problems, waste and
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literature review(vimala) - COLLEGE OF BUSINESS PROGRAMME...

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