NotesOnSG - Principles of Signal Generators A signal...

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Principles of Signal Generators A signal generator is an electronic instrument that generates repeating voltage waveforms. An ideal signal generator can simply be modeled as a voltage source as shown in Fig 2.1.1 (a) (a) (b) Fig 2.1.1 where V s (t) is a specified function of time. A practical signal generator is modeled as an ideal signal generator connected to a series source resistance (output resistance) R s as shown in Fig 2.1.1 (b). The terminal voltage, v(t), is the output of the signal generator and depends on the terminal current, i(t), and R s . V s (t) can be, in general, a sine wave, a square wave, a triangular wave or a pulse train. The first three are characterized by three parameters: frequency (or period), amplitude, and DC (Offset) value. The pulse train is associated with frequency, amplitude and pulse duration. These parameters can be set to any value in the operation range of the signal generator, using the external controls. In general, amplitude ranges of signal generators vary from 10 mV to 20 V, and frequency ranges vary from 1 μ Hz to 40 MHz. This means signals for which the amplitude and frequency can be set to any value in these ranges can be generated using these signal generators. Signal generators usually produce more than one type of signals. Different signal types can be obtained by proper connection and/or switching.
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NotesOnSG - Principles of Signal Generators A signal...

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