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Lecture Outline Chapter 5

Lecture Outline Chapter 5 - Judge and Langdon Connections A...

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Judge and Langdon Connections: A World History Chapter 5: Early American Societies: Connection and Isolation, 20,000 B . C . E . – 1500 C . E . Lecture Outline I. Origins and Arrival of the Amerinds Though most of the Amerinds formed small isolated communities, complex societies developed in Mesoamerica and the Andes region. A. Migration from the Eastern Hemisphere 1. Evidence and timing 2. Alternative theories II. The Amerinds of North America Agriculture first appeared in the Americas, in Mexico, around 5000 B.C.E. Evidence of most of these early societies comes from the archaeological record. Listen to the audio Early Americas on myhistorylab.com A. Two Hunter-Gatherer Bands 1. Arctic 2. Great Basin B. Five Limited-Scale Tribal Societies 1. Sub-Arctic 2. Northwest Coast 3. Plateau 4. Southwest 5. California C. Four Full-Scale Tribal Societies 1. Plains 2. Prairie 3. Southeast 4. Eastern Woodlands D. Three Complex Societies Read the document Nineteenth-century description of Cahokia , on myhistorylab.com 1. Adena 2. Hopewell 3. Mississippian society III. The Amerinds of Mesoamerica View the map Pre-Columbian Civilization in Mesoamerica , on myhistorylab.com A. The Olmec of the Preclassic Period (1800 B . C . E . – 150 C . E .) 1. Discovery 2. Olmec cities 3. Trade networks 4. Calendar
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5. Spread and collapse B. The Maya of the Classic Period (150 – 900 C .
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