IMG_0002_NEW_0005

IMG_0002_NEW_0005 - easier way to determine splitting of a proton is the N 1 rule Simply stated the signal corresponding to a proton(or set of

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A much easier way to determine splitting of a proton is the N+1 rule. Simply stated, the signal corresponding to a proton (or set of equivalent protons) will be split into N+l signals, where L: the number of EQUIVALENT protons pn an ADJAIENT f,arbonlnote: by adjacent, the carbon MUST be attached directly to the carbon to *frfricfu the proton(s) of interest is/are attached. IF a proton (or set of equivalent protons) has two or more sets of equivalent protons on adjacent carbons, the signal will be sptit into (x+!); N t rj. ....'""0 become very complex. @ ^-tr" For the above example of bromoethane, protons) adjacent to the methylene (CH2) will be split into (3 + 1) :4 signals. To determine the intensity of these signals, use Pascal's triangle: No. signals from splitting Pascal's triangle name of signal there are 3 equivalent protons (methyl VIFJ . , r protons, therefore the mithylene protons JAll_ JrlA ,VW I 2 J 4 5 6 1 i ll 121 13 31 146 41 1 5 10 10 5 1 1615201561 singlet (s) doublet (d)
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This note was uploaded on 12/27/2011 for the course CHEM 281 taught by Professor Williams during the Fall '11 term at Simon Fraser.

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