Mountain waves and sundowners-2010

Mountain waves and sundowners-2010 - Mountainwavesand...

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Mountain waves and  sundowners
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All hell broke loose " City Fire Chief Andrew DiMizio, May 8 2009
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Important concepts to review Adiabatic lifting (or adiabatic expansion)  Adiabatic sinking (or adiabatic  compression) Saturation mixing ratio, temperature, dew  point  and relative humidity Stability of the atmosphere
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H=0  T=30 o C H=100m, T=29 o C H=200m, T=28 o C H=300m T=27 o C H=400m T=26 o C  Air parcel lifts due to  increase in buoyancy  (warmer and less dense  than the surrounding  environment)  Volume expands and  work is done against the  environment.  This occurs too fast to  transfer or receive heat  from the environment  Because no heat is  transferred from or to the  air parcel, volume  increases and the air  mass inside the air parcel  cools down This is known as  adiabatic lifting Adiabatic lifting (adiabatic  expansion)  Dry adiabatic lapse rat 10 o C/km or 1 o C/100m
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Adiabatic compression   Air parcel sinks Volume decreases due  to the work done by the  environment  This occurs too fast to  transfer or receive heat  from the environment  Because no heat is  transferred from or to the  air parcel, volume  decreases and the air  mass inside the air parcel  warms up This is known as  adiabatic compression or  adiabatic sink H=0  T=30 o C H=100m, T=29 o C H=200m, T=28 o C H=300m T=27 o C H=400m T=26 o C Dry adiabatic lapse rat 10 o C/km or 1 o C/100m
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The air’s susceptibility to uplift is called its static stability . Statically unstable air becomes buoyant when lifted and continues to rise if given an initial upward push. Statically stable air resists upward displacement and sinks back to its original level when the lifting mechanism ceases. Statically neutral air neither rises on its own following an initial lift nor sinks back to its original level; it simply comes to rest at the height to which it was displaced.
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When a parcel of unsaturated or saturated air is lifted and the Environmental Lapse Rate (ELR) is greater than the dry adiabatic lapse rate (DALR), the result is absolutely unstable air . T=9 
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This note was uploaded on 12/28/2011 for the course GEOG 110 taught by Professor Leila during the Fall '09 term at UCSB.

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Mountain waves and sundowners-2010 - Mountainwavesand...

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