Tropical_cyclones_Hurricanes_v2_2010

Tropical_cyclones_Hu - Tropical Storms and Hurricanes Tropical Motivation Super Hurricanes http/www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXMj1yHgfPE&NR=1&featu This

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Tropical Storms and Hurricanes Tropical Storms and Hurricanes
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Motivation Super Hurricanes Super Hurricanes http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXMj1yHgfPE&NR=1&feat
Background image of page 2
This material was partially provided by the following sources: Prof. Jennifer Collins (Florida State University), Aguado and Burt: Understanding Weather and Climate Comet educational program - UCAR (see websites in the last slide) Mr. Forest Cannon (graduate student Dept. Geography)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tropical Cyclones and Hurricanes Tropical Cyclones and Hurricanes 1. 1. Tropical cyclone and hurricane development, Tropical cyclone and hurricane development, structure, and movement structure, and movement 2. 2. Hurricane damages, warning systems, and naming Hurricane damages, warning systems, and naming conventions conventions
Background image of page 4
Extremely strong tropical storms go by a number of different names, depending on where they occur . Over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific they are hurricanes . Those over the extreme western Pacific are called typhoons ; those over the Indian Ocean and Australia are cyclones . They are all considered tropical cyclones Regional Names
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hurricanes, Typhoons and tropical Cyclones around the globe. Seasonal Variability and local names Typhoons Typhoons Cyclones Cyclones Cyclones Cyclones Hurricanes Hurricanes Hurricanes Hurricanes Cyclones Cyclones
Background image of page 6
Hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of 120 km/hr (74 mph) and are typically about 600 kilometers (350 mi) wide. Sea level pressure near the center of a typical hurricane is around 950 mb, but pressures as low as 870 mb have been observed for extremely powerful hurricanes. Some of the main characteristics of a Hurricane Some of the main characteristics of a Hurricane
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hurricanes obtain most of their energy from the latent heat released by condensation and are most common where a deep layer of warm water fuels them. August and September are the prime hurricane months in the Northern Hemisphere, while January to March is the main season in the Southern Hemisphere.
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hurricane numbers vary considerable each year with a maximum number in the North Atlantic ever recorded in a single year of 15. This of course occurred recently in the infamous 2005 season. A minimum number of 2 occurred in 1982 which was an El Nino year. There is a mean number of hurricanes in this basin of just under 6 a year. Did you know…
Background image of page 10
Important questions: Why do hurricanes form? What causes their interannual variability? That is, why sometimes they are so frequent (as in 2005 – 15 hurricanes) and other times so rare (as in 1982 – 2 hurricanes – El Nino year)
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Gray’s factors for tropical cyclone formation Geographic Coriolis Force sufficient to give initial cyclonic spin Dynamic Low vertical wind shear (shear is the vertical variation of the wind either in speed or direction) Thermodynamic High values of relative humidity Sea Surface Temperatures > 26-27 o C (~79-81 o F) to a depth of 60 m (~200 ft) An unstable atmosphere
Background image of page 12
Coriolis effect and hurricanes Top view No Coriolis Effects With Coriolis Effects (Northern Hemisphere example) Low Low
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Internal Dynamics L Horizonta l Pressure Gradient
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/28/2011 for the course GEOG 133 taught by Professor Leila during the Fall '09 term at UCSB.

Page1 / 68

Tropical_cyclones_Hu - Tropical Storms and Hurricanes Tropical Motivation Super Hurricanes http/www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXMj1yHgfPE&NR=1&featu This

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online