Lipid Bilayer Structure1

Lipid Bilayer Structure1 - insoluble in water. There are...

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Lipid Bilayer Structure The lipid bilayer is a universal component of all cell membranes. Its role is critical because its structural components provide the barrier that marks the boundaries of a cell. The structure is called a "lipid bilayer" because it is composed of two layers of fat cells organized in two sheets. The lipid bilayer is typically about five nanometers thick and surrounds all cells providing the cell membrane structure. Lipids and Phospholipids The structure of the lipid bilayer explains its function as a barrier. Lipids are fats, like oil, that are
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Unformatted text preview: insoluble in water. There are two important regions of a lipid that provide the structure of the lipid bilayer. Each lipid molecule contains a hydrophilic region, also called a polar head region, and a hydrophobic, or nonpolar tail region. The hydrophilic region is attracted to aqueous water conditions while the hydrophobic region is repelled from such conditions. Since a lipid molecule contains regions that are both polar and nonpolar, they are called amphipathic molecules....
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