Grant3 - Grant, realizing he could probably take Vicksburg...

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Unformatted text preview: Grant, realizing he could probably take Vicksburg from the north, set about digging trenches and dredging new rivers that could move the troops south of the city. In April, a flotilla of Navy gunboats, under heavy fire, ran the blockade at Vicksburg to come to Grant's assistance. Now under Grant's control, McClernand and Sherman crossed the Mississippi in May, nine miles south of Vicksburg. At Champion's Hill, Grant led the forces to a strong rout of Confederate troops and isolated them. On May 22, 1863, a daylong direct attack on the breastworks of the city failed to yield results. Grant lost 3,200 men, far more than his opponent, but his strategy began to emergea strategy that no other Union general could ever stomach, but one that would eventually lead to victory. Grant knew that he had more men to lose than his enemy, and was not afraid to wear down his opponents with brutal assault after brutal assault. He was not afraid to wear down his opponents with brutal assault after brutal assault....
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