The Union Army did not stop1

The Union Army did not stop1 - The Union Army did not stop....

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Unformatted text preview: The Union Army did not stop. Grant began to search for a new opening through which to attack the Confederate Army, and he found it in small railroad town of Petersburg. His engineers secretly constructed a pontoon bridge across the James River, and all but a few corps of the army crossed behind Lee's lines to attack Petersburg. When a frontal assault again failed, Grant settled in for another siege. Time was still on his side. Failing to capture Petersburg by surprise, he settled down to a regular siege. From June 18, 1864, to April 2, 1865, the Army of the Potomac sat and waited outside Petersburg. Grant figured he could starve Lee out. Meanwhile, the other Union armies were far from idle. General Philip Sheridan led a cavalry force through the Shenandoah Valley, destroying much of the fertile cropland in the area. Farther south, Sherman had begun his now-infamous march to the sea. He cut the area....
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This note was uploaded on 12/25/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Summer '08 term at Texas State.

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The Union Army did not stop1 - The Union Army did not stop....

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