Farmers were hit particularly hard by the national economic crisis

Farmers were hit particularly hard by the national economic crisis

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Unformatted text preview: Farmers were hit particularly hard by the national economic crisis, although poverty was everywhere. The troubles came to a climax in 1786, when Daniel Shays of western Massachusetts led a revolt of farmers to protest the state's high taxes, which had been increased to unprecedented heights in order to pay back debts. Rumors quickly spread that an army of 15,000 troops was ready to march, but Shay's Rebellion, as it came to be known, was not nearly that large. Nevertheless, the uprising prompted many in the government to call for reform. Several states, including New York, agreed to meet in Annapolis, Maryland to discuss possible amendments to some areas of the Articles of Confederation. The conference was to be held in September of 1786. Very few people took the conference seriously. Alexander Hamilton was one of five delegates chosen to represent New York at the conference, but not all of his colleagues...
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