The aftermath of World War I meant economic and political instability in Germany

The aftermath of World War I meant economic and political instability in Germany

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Unformatted text preview: The aftermath of World War I meant economic and political instability in Germany. Fear of communism left the nation in a state of paranoia. Rising inflation put all families in distress. Heisenberg himself was sent to a farm for one summer where he experienced hard labor for the first time. Political instability and general disillusionment also drove him to the youth movement, retreating along with many of Germany's young people. The activities of this youth movement taught Heisenberg to question tradition, a skill that would prove invaluable for his scientific career. Despite the disrupting influence of the war, Heisenberg managed to achieve a world- class education, perhaps largely due to independent study. This education prepared him for a sizable role in what many view as the golden years of physics. Max Planck and Albert Einstein began the revolution with quantum theory. Einstein also changed the Albert Einstein began the revolution with quantum theory....
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