The British -...

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The British, angry with America's borderline participation in the wars, began taking  measures into their own hands. Great Britain still maintained military outposts in the  westernmost lands of the United States, and refused to remove these soldiers. British  soldiers also began to impress American civilians and merchant sailors into serving on  British warships, and the British navy seized hundreds of American merchant ships. To  prevent war with Great Britain, Hamilton encouraged Washington to send Supreme  Court Chief Justice John Jay to London to sign a treaty with the English. Jay left for  England in 1794 with instructions from Hamilton that outlined American goals for the  diplomatic talks. In his instructions, Hamilton insisted that British impressments of  Americans cease, that all British forts be removed from American territory, and that the  random seizure of American ships come to a full stop. Jay signed a treaty in the fall of 1794, but Jay's Treaty, as it came to be known, was a 
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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