The direct impetus for the uncertainty principle was a letter from Pauli

The direct impetus for the uncertainty principle was a letter from Pauli

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Unformatted text preview: The direct impetus for the uncertainty principle was a letter from Pauli. Max Born had started things with his statistical interpretation of Schrdinger's wave equation. He treated the function as a probability wave, rather than a matter wave, as Schrdinger had proposed. Pauli theorized from this statistical interpretation the existence of a "dark point," where we cannot exactly observe the path of a particle. This meant that if the position of the particle were controlled, then its momentum had to be uncontrolled. Heisenberg extended this idea to focus not on an uncontrollable variable but rather the indeterminacy of both in a reciprocal manner. That is, the more accurately we measure one variable, the less accurately it will be possible to measure the other. The reason for this is that the very act of measurement affects the particle's velocity (momentum and...
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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