Though Heisenberg submitted to the Nazi regime when necessary

Though Heisenberg submitted to the Nazi regime when necessary

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Though Heisenberg submitted to the Nazi regime when necessary, his cooperation was  insufficient. He often avoided overt public acknowledgement of the Third Reich, using  the separation of science and politics as his excuse. Moreover, he publicly opposed the  efforts of Philipp Lenard and Johannes Stark to completely discredit Einstein's work.  Lenard and Stark were Nobel Prize-winning experimental physicists whose areas of  specialty had long since become irrelevant. Indeed, their declarations against Einstein's  work as "Jewish physics"–they believed that science was fundamentally connected to  the individual and his race and religion–were not a little influenced by their jealousy of  Einstein's renown. Heisenberg could not allow such unreasoned criticism to pass  unchallenged, and his opposition was seen as insubordination. Lenard and Stark  focused much of their propaganda against Heisenberg, and as they were gaining 
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Though Heisenberg submitted to the Nazi regime when necessary

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