1540 brought many more trials and executions

1540 brought many more trials and executions -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1540 brought many more trials and executions. In July, Henry staged a sensational trial  and execution in the name of the new Church of England. Three Protestants and three  Roman Catholics were tried and dragged through the streets of London. The  Protestants were burned for heresy, and the Catholics drawn and quartered, the fullest  punishment for treason. The most important figure to be sent to the block that summer,  however, was Thomas Cromwell, who had once been Henry's most powerful minister.  The Anne of Cleves disaster had been Cromwell's downfall, but his death without a trial  was made possible, as well, by accusations that he had been using his position as the  king's Viceregent to protect Lutherans and to see that the orthodox Six Articles were not  enforced throughout the realm. He was condemned as a "detestable heretic" and  beheaded for treason. Henry's chief orthodox ministers, the Duke of Norfolk and Bishop 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online