A small wagon bore the family patriarch to a nearby cemetery near the Waxhaw church

A small wagon bore the family patriarch to a nearby cemetery near the Waxhaw church

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Unformatted text preview: A small wagon bore the family patriarch to a nearby cemetery near the Waxhaw church. However, when the funeral procession arrived at the burial site, they discovered the casket had fallen off somewhere en route, and they were therefore forced to retrace their steps to find the body. After the funeral for Andrew's father, his mother moved in with relativesmost likely the Crawfords, the most prosperous of the Jacksons' relations. Elizabeth's grief soon brought on labor, and on March 15, 1767, she gave birth to a healthy baby boy, naming him Andrew in honor of her deceased husband. In an odd note, both North Carolina and South Carolina claim that Jackson was born within their borders. North Carolina historians insist Elizabeth gave birth not at the home of her in- laws, the Crawfords, but at her brother-in-law's house just over the North Carolina...
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A small wagon bore the family patriarch to a nearby cemetery near the Waxhaw church

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