By the mid - By the mid-1520s, King Henry VIII had grown...

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Unformatted text preview: By the mid-1520s, King Henry VIII had grown very unhappy in his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. She had, by then, borne him eight children, with only the Princess Mary (born 1516) surviving infancy. Henry wished for a male heir to stabilize the future succession of the Crown. For state and personal reasons, he sought a divorce from Catherine so that he might marry Anne Boleyn, a young lady of the court with whom he had fallen in love. Between 1527 and 1535, England was preoccupied with the political and religious questions attendant to what was called "the King's great matter." Divorcing a queen in the early sixteenth century was very serious. Though there were precedents, the reigning laws of the Catholic Church forbade divorce unless the couple were granted a special dispensation from the Pope. Henry convinced himself, however, that his marriage to Catherine had never been a real marriage, because it contradicted...
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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