Henry VIII -...

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Henry VIII's reign, in some respects, marks England's transition from a medieval to a  modern nation. This is particularly evident in the political changes resulting from Henry's  policies during and after his break with the Roman Catholic Church. This break  represented England's maturity into a wholly independent, sovereign nation-state. Also,  though Parliament's significance was overshadowed at the time by Henry's domineering  personality, the break with Rome was crucial for the establishment of England's  constitutional monarchy. Henry's revolutionary claims – among them that he was the  Supreme Head on Earth of the Church of England– needed the support of Parliament to  become a political reality. Henry received this support, laying down constitutional  foundations that set England apart from monarchies such as France and Spain, which  tended more toward royal absolutism. The unique political situation of Henry's England made his country's religious 
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Henry VIII -...

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