In the mid - In the mid-1790s, the territory of Tennessee...

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Unformatted text preview: In the mid-1790s, the territory of Tennessee commissioned a census to determine whether the area met the 60,000-inhabitant threshold to be admitted as a U.S. State. When the census discovered that more than 77,000 lived in the area, the government ordered a convention to draft a new constitution and hopefully admit Tennessee to the Union. Andrew Jackson was selected as one of the five delegates from Davidson County. He and his fellow delegates traveled to Nashville on January 11, 1796, to begin the work. The convention debated and wrote the new constitution for twenty-seven days, during which Jackson made few major contributions. Popular lore says that Jackson suggested the name "Tennessee" for the new state, but many historians doubt whether he actually did. Jackson did second the motion to make the legislature bicameral, and he vehemently opposed a clause that would require all public officeholders to believe in...
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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In the mid - In the mid-1790s, the territory of Tennessee...

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