It was clear from the beginning that the Pope would not grant Henry a dispensation to divorce Cather

It was clear from the beginning that the Pope would not grant Henry a dispensation to divorce Cather

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It was clear from the beginning that the Pope would not grant Henry a dispensation to  divorce Catherine. Rather than submit to the wishes of Rome–after many failed efforts  by Wolsey and others to pressure the Pope–Henry chose to sidestep established  canonical procedure. Wolsey himself became the first victim of the King's anger, losing  his office as chancellor in August 1529 because he had failed in the negotiations with  Rome. Wolsey was replaced by Sir Thomas More, who took the job on the condition that  he not be involved in the divorce matter, and who would later prove a greater problem  for Henry than Wolsey. At this time the government was effectively in the hands of the  dukes of Norfolk, Suffolk, and Wiltshire, the last of whom was Anne Boleyn's father. . In July 1531, Henry officially separated from Catherine and began to live openly with 
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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