Jackson was extremely bright and began reading at an early age

Jackson was extremely bright and began reading at an early age

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Jackson was extremely bright and began reading at an early age–a hobby he would  soon drop in favor of pastimes he felt more exciting. He studied Greek and Latin at the  academy in Waxhaw, but never developed much talent in either field. Despite his  intellectual promise, Jackson never showed much ability to write, and his poor spelling  appalled his friends. Ultimately, his lack of interest in reading, coupled with his poor  writing skills, left him poorly educated, even by eighteenth-century standards. He  learned little about science or mathematics, and the only non-religious book he is known  to have read cover-to-cover is the  The Vicar of Wakefield  by Oliver Goldsmith. Whatever  political intuition he later acquired came from his own experiences, as he never formally  studied politics, law or history. Though Jackson's mother hoped he would enter the ministry, from his earliest days he 
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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