The British took the two Jackson boys and twenty other prisoners from the battle to Camden

The British took the two Jackson boys and twenty other prisoners from the battle to Camden

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Unformatted text preview: The British took the two Jackson boys and twenty other prisoners from the battle to Camden, nearly forty miles away. There, the British placed all of them into a small prisoner camp with 250 other men, with no medicine, no beds, and only a small amount of bread for food. Both boys became infected with smallpox and would have likely died had their mother, Elizabeth, not helped to arrange a prisoner transferthe patriots turned over thirteen redcoats and the British freed seven prisoners, including the two Jacksons. Andrew walked the forty miles back to Waxhaw, while his mother and his dying brother rode beside him. Robert died two days after returning home, and it was several weeks before Andrew regained enough of his health to leave his bed. After Andrew regained his strength, his mother left to tend to other soldiers in Charleston. She and other Waxhaw helped soldiers held prisoner in prison ships in the Charleston....
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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