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The elections of 1824 and 1828 stand as some of the dirtiest campaigns ever waged for the Presidency

The elections of 1824 and 1828 stand as some of the dirtiest campaigns ever waged for the Presidency

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The elections of 1824 and 1828 stand as some of the dirtiest campaigns ever waged for  the Presidency. Jackson won the popular vote handily in 1824, but, after failing to win a  majority of the electoral vote, lost the Presidency in a runoff in the House of  Representatives. Jackson quickly turned his attention to 1828 and won a solid victory in  that year. Jackson's Presidency was marked by four major issues: The Second Bank of the United  States, the Tariff of 1828, the Nullification Crisis, and Indian Removal. Jackson signed  over ninety treaties with Indian tribes and moved them all west of the Mississippi–killing  thousands in the process. The Nullification Crisis arose after Vice President John C.  Calhoun furthered the idea that a state could refuse to obey a federal law, "nullify it," if  that state wanted to. South Carolina voted to nullify the Tariff of 1828, and for a while it 
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