The new United States grew rapidly

The new United States grew rapidly -...

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The new United States grew rapidly, expanding ever westward. President Thomas  Jefferson bought the Louisiana Purchase from France, more than doubling the size of  the country overnight. The frontier moved from the Carolinas westward to Georgia,  Kentucky and Jackson's new home, Tennessee. As the United States grew, though, it struggled to assert itself on the world stage.  Pirates from the Barbary States–Algiers, Morocco, Tripoli and Tunis–declared war on  American shipping in 1801. Jefferson sent naval and marine forces to Tripoli in defense,  and Tripoli finally asked for peace in 1805. Tensions remained high with Britain as well,  and it was not long before Americans again found themselves defending their homes  from the Redcoats. In 1812, American forces invaded Canada, then a British colony, and British forces  invaded the United States. In 1814, the British forced President James Madison to flee 
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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