The prime issue for Jackson remained the Second Bank of the United States

The prime issue for Jackson remained the Second Bank of the United States

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The prime issue for Jackson remained the Second Bank of the United States, although  he tried to bury it in his message, referring to it only for seventeen lines. Given  Jackson's previous financial problems with credit, he distrusted banks and especially  disliked the Second Bank's vast influence on financial policy ever since it helped start  the Panic of 1819. The Bank's charter would have to be renewed by Congress in 1836,  and Jackson had serious concerns about the constitutionality of some of the provisions  in the charter. Jackson's first major dispute revolved around the tariff issue. South Carolina, the home  state of Jackson's vice president, John C. Calhoun, had adopted Calhoun's opinion that  a state had the right under the Constitution to nullify a treaty or tariff made by the federal  government if the federal policy caused damage to that state. South Carolina had only 
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This note was uploaded on 12/27/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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